ArtBookGuy
  Art For All People®    Real Talk About Contemporary Art    May 2017
DIT COESEBRINK: CLARITY IS AN ILLUSION

Ironically, that statement becomes quite clear when you look at the work of German artist Dit Coesebrink www.coesebrink.de.  To me, his work is very mystical and conjures up faint images that seem real yet simultaneously elusive.  They leave much to personal interpretation and that’s exactly the way Dit prefers it.  Here’s our chat …    

MICHAEL: Hey Dit! First of all, you have the most minimalist, elegant website I've ever seen. Why did you design it that way?

DIT: I just like websites in a minimalistic style. This one I have seen by Karoline Daussien an artist and a friend of mine. To explain it more precisely, I favor the easy way of scrolling down the page along the different canvases, the plainness and that the works of art are in the focus of attention. I would like to keep my website in a continual condition of change with new canvases coming up and old artworks leaving.

MICHAEL: Dit, To me, your work looks like both paintings and at the same time, drawings. The images are very faint and seem like shadows of people from far away. Did you want to do this?

DIT: I like to let both styles correspond with each other. The paintings seem to be unfinished similar to the canvasses of Gustav Klimt or Francis Bacon. Both artists use an empty raw canvas as an artistic medium and their figures and portraits are in a constant motion. My paintings can be described as an inter-stage between life in past and future. I mean a life with all secrets in that respect. The figures appear out of nothingness and in return disappear in the painted space. What happened
here can be seen as an equivalent to life itself, where people come and go as well.

MICHAEL: For that reason, some people may see your work as difficult.  Do you think it's difficult or challenging for people?

DIT: My paintings should be a challenge. Sometimes people believe they are difficult to understand, but that is actually what I like. Difficult issues are meant to be a challenge. I want to give mysticism and symbolism some space. Unanswered questions tempt me much more than clarity. Clarity is just an illusion. A challenging painting will linger on in the mind for a longer time than an easy one. I like to discover things.

MICHAEL: So which do you prefer ... to construct or deconstruct?  To build or to take apart?

DIT: Many paintings of mine emerge from a kind of intuition or an inner voice. Sometimes later, even years later after the paintings come into existence it becomes clear to me why I painted them. The process of creation is a slow one. It happens in a silent and self-referential way. But sometimes the paintings seem to be tough, although it was not my intention. It is always fascinating to hear something about the way people are thinking about my art, especially when it differs from my own view concerning my paintings. In my position as a painter, I construct a new form of reality, but in doing so, the reality is always under consideration. Thinking about intangible subjects, intuition and the intellectual process of balancing reasons and explaining them are central to my way of working. The reaction of the beholder is a new form of perception that does not
depend on my intentions.

MICHAEL: Where do you think your talent comes from?  Do you come from an artistic family?

DIT: I cannot say something about the origin of my talent for sure. Actually I come from a solid middle class family with a vivid interest in art, politics and society. We often discussed classical music and art catalogues at home. Under that influence, I began to be creative at a very young age.

MICHAEL: What do you think of the contemporary art world today? Are you part of the art scene? How do you spread the word about your art?

DIT: The current art scene is very different. That makes it exciting, but also difficult. Today there are many directions of art and many ways of thinking and it is not easy to understand them. Unlike some directions in contemporary art, I am a part of an art world where the artist is unique. The relationship between art and life is important. My life in particular, life in general and thinking about art are the key aspects of my artistic exploration. These processes should be very visible in my paintings and to present them in public should have a reason out of that activity.

MICHAEL: Finally Dit, What do you want people to see, think and feel when they look at your work?

DIT: In my opinion, art is something that is detached from the audience. That applies especially to the development of paintings. Later the beholder makes up his own mind about what he sees by reflecting his inner feelings and his experiences. The painting is a medium that brings up different associations. Similar to music, it evokes emotions and dreams or is an instrument of meditation. I think to be open to experiences is essential to understanding art. This mentality may positively influence people in their lives as well. They are not only open to art, but also to themselves. I have achieved much as a painter if I make those thoughts visible.

MICHAEL: Thanks Dit.  This has been great.

DIT: Cool Michael.  Very good!  And thanks a lot!

Check out Dit Coesebrink’s work at www.coesebrink.de.



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